Category Archives: Flowers

Experiencing the KingsRiver Kloof

Ever been on a trail with no definite path, where you have to make route decisions and face their consequences? At times your safety rests on a knife edge. Mother nature is up close and personal. It’s only you and a trusted friend, together you need to face whatever reveals itself around the next bend and overcome the obstacles together. 

That’s what you get on the KingsRiver “Trail”!

This seldom ventured trail winds through the KingsRiver Kloof near the sleepy village of McGregor. For the adventurous – it’s an extremely enjoyable 5km trail.

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An attempt to portray the beauty of the kloof.

It involves lots of river crosses, easy rock climbing sections and path making. On the trail we saw a pair of klipspringers, the aloe aloe comptonii in bloom and a massive ancient San cave.

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The swim near the end is always a highlight! 

You can also view an older video I made of the KingsRiver Trail on youtube. I made it for my 16’th birthday.

Experiences such as this one will remain locked up in one’s memories and they’ll be cherished till old age. That is why it’s so important to life a full and exciting life!  

 

 

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Disas of Leopard’s Kloof revisited

Happy 2016 to all readers! May it be filled with lots of wonderful experiences!

Grandpa, my sister and I went on our annual expedition up Leopard’s Kloof to view the Red Disas in flower. See my previous post on Leopard’s Kloof to find out more about this stimulating route.

The Red Disas grow in the moist moss which covers the rocks surrounding the Leopard’s Kloof waterfall. We spotted one in bloom close to the base of the fall. This is considered lucky because in the past there were many more Disas at lower levels of the fall which have now gone because of environmentally harmful activities like the picking or total removal of these flowers.

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Orchids (like this one) are some of the most beautiful creations on Earth. Seeing the Red Disas again was an amazing experience. A good kick off  to 2016!

Kogelberg 22km Hike

A mental and physical challenge made easy by beautiful surroundings! 

Kogelberg 22 km trail (roughly 13,6 miles) meanders around the steep and high Platberg, 910m. What made this route special was how we hiked through different ecosystems including forest, mountain, plateau and river. Needless to say, the fynbos always provide ample photo opportunities. Among other things, we encountered the Red Crassula, the Inkflower, lots of Ericas and the Cape Everlasting. Another special experience I’ll never forget is spotting a beehive.

Interesting fact from Kogelberg Biosphere Reserve: Scientists believe that the amazing fynbos’ biodiversity is the result of the southern tip of Africa having escaped the last ice age that destroyed numerous plant species around the world. As such, many of the 8,560 different plant species found in the Cape Floral Kingdom are literally ‘living fossils’. The Cape Floral Kingdom also has more endemic species for its area than anywhere else in the world … some 5,800 species.

The location of this trail is the same as the Palmiet River Hike, in Kogelberg Nature Reserve.The reserve lies between the towns of Kleinmond and Betty’s Bay and is easily accessible via a paved road. Permits cost R40 per adult. Wear comfortable shoes, appropriate clothing and water.

Nature will always provide with a memorable experience, no matter where you are or what you’re doing!

Leopard’s Kloof

A ravine forest. Streams the color of black tea.Twisting past yellowwood and hard pear, towers of the forest. The thundering waterfall displays the red disa along the rock face.  

The Harold Porter National Botanical Garden (located in Betty’s Bay, South Africa) features the magnificent Leopard’s Kloof Trail. The garden has a rich diversity of cape fynbos, including the renown marsh rose. Pay it a visit any time!

Leopard’s Kloof is a refreshing 3km walk in a ravine and turns around at a waterfall where the red disa can be spotted in December. The route has a few wooden ladders, but is otherwise quite easy. The forest is full of ancient, endemic trees like the yellowwood, hard pear and cape beech. A couple of waterfalls comes by where (if the sun doesn’t shine) one can take some beautiful long exposure photo’s. Look out for the metallic glint of the sunbirds in the garden and the small cape batis in the forest.

 

 

 

A place to replenish the soul. Make it one of your destinations! 

Disa species I’ve photographed.

All the different species of disa one can find amazes me. Keep an eye out for these pretty orchids!    

There are still many I wish to find. Keep a look out for the disa in December. Its important to know which disa  you’re looking for, some grow on sandstone slopes while others grow on wet cliffs. A field guide to the fynbos of Southern Africa helps a lot.

I’d like to see your disa photos and where you took them.